GTP for BDD

Graphical Test Plan

I read a little about graphical test planning created by Hardeep Sharma and championed by David Bradley, both from Citrix. It’s a novel idea and sort of similar to the mind map test planning I have played around with. The difference is your not capturing features or various heuristics and test strategies in a mind map, you are mapping expected behavior only. Then you derive a test plan from the graphical understanding of the expected behavior of the system. I don’t know a lot about GTP, so this is a very watered down explanation. I won’t attempt to explain it, but you can read all about it:

Plan Business Driven Development with GTP

What interested me was the fact that I could abstract how we currently spec features into a GTP type model. I know the point of GTP is not to model features, but our specs model behavior and they happen to be captured in feature files. Its classic Behavior Driven Development (BDD) with Gherkin. We have a feature that defines some aspect of value that the system is expected to provide to users. In the feature we have various scenarios that describe the expected behaviors of the feature. Scenarios have steps that define pre-condition, action, and expectations (PAE) or in Gherkin, Given-When-Then (GWT) that define how a user would execute the scenario. We also have feature backgrounds which is a feature wide pre-condition that is shared by all scenarios in the feature.
I said we use Gherkin, but our new test runner transcends just GWT. We can define PAE in plain English without the GWT constraints, we can select the terms to describe PAE instead of being forced to use GWT which sometimes causes us to jump through hoops to force the GWT wording to sound correct. 

GTP Diagram

If we applied something like GTP we would model the scenarios, but there would be more hierarchy before we define the executable scenarios. We currently use tagging to group similar scenarios that exercise a specific subset of a feature’s scenarios. This allows us to provide faster feedback by running checks for just a subset instead of the entire feature when we are only concerned with changes to the subset. In a GTP’ish model the left most portion of the diagram would hold generalized behavior specs, similar to how we use tagging, and as we go to the right the behavior becomes more granular until we hit a demarcation point for executable scenarios that can then be expressed in a linked test case diagram (TCD). In the GTP there are ways to capture meta data like related requirement/ticket ID for traceability back to requirements. Also, meta for demarcation point (can’t think of better name) to link to the TCD or feature file that further defines it.

Test Case Diagram

The test case diagram would define various scenarios that define the behavior of the demarcation points in the GTP. The TCD diagram would also include background preconditions and the steps to execute the scenario. At this point it feels like this is an extra step. We have to write the TCD in a feature file so diagramming it is creating a redundant document that has to be maintained.
In the TCD there are shapes for behavior, preconditions, steps, and expectations. I think there should be additional shapes or meta to express tags because this is important in how we categorize and control running of scenarios. It may help if there is also meta to link back to the GTP that the TCD is derived from so we can flow back and forth between the diagrams. Meta in the TCD is important because it gives us the ability extract understanding outside of just the test plan and design. We could have shapes, meta descriptions and links to
  • execute automated checks
  • open a manual exploratory test tool
  • view current test state (pass/fail)
  • view historical data (how many times has this step failed, when was the last failure of this scenario…)
  • view flake analysis or score
  • view delivery pipeline related to an execution
  • view team members responsible for plan, develop, test and release
  • view related requirement or ticket
  • much more…

Since we also define manual tests by just tagging features or scenarios with a manual tag or creating exploratory test based feature files, we could do this for both automated checks and manual tests.

GTP-BDD Binding

To get rid of the TCD redundancy we could generate the feature file from the diagram or vice-versa. Being able to bind GTP to BDD would make GTP more valuable to me.
We would need an abstract object graph that could be used to generate both the diagram and the feature file (Excel spread sheet, HTML page or whatever else). We are almost here, we have a tool that can generate feature files from persisted objects and vice versa. We would just have to figure out how to generate the diagram and express it as an interactive UI and not just a static picture.
What we have been struggling with is the ability to manually edit feature files and keep that in sync with the persisted objects. With a centralized UI this is easy because everyone uses the UI to update the objects. When people are updating features files from a source code repository we have to worry about merge conflicts (yuck) and if we consider the feature file or the persisted object as the source of truth. So, we may have to reduce flexibility and force everyone to use the UI only. Everyone would have to have discipline and not touch the feature files even though we have nice tools built into our IDE to help write and manage them. The tool would have to detect when someone has violated the policy and so on…I digress.

Conclusion

With a graphical UI modeled on GTP/TCD to manage BDD we can provide an arguably simpler way to visualize tests and provide the ability to drill down to see different aspects of test plans and designs and their related current and historical execution. With 2-way binding from diagram to feature file we have a new way to manage our executable specifications. This model could provide a powerful tool to not only aide test planning, but test management as a whole. The end result would hopefully be a better understanding for the team, increased flow in delivery pipeline, enhanced feedback, and more value to the customer and the business.
Now lets ask Google if something like this already exists so I don’t have to add it to my ever increasing backlog of things I want to build. Thanks to Hardeep Sharma, David Bradley, and Citrix for sharing GTP.

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